Ashley Schafer

Ashley Schafer| Barrel Racer

Ashley Shafer, Professional Barrel Racer, is starting off her rookie year on the ERA Premier Tour. She qualified for the 2016, The American in Dallas, Texas and so far she says that is her most memorable moment in her rodeo career. Shafer’s career thus far has pertained to training futurity horses for the past 6 years. We asked her why she is excited about being apart of the ERA Premier Tour she said, DzDue to my career as a Futurity Trainer I don’t get to go to enough rodeos to have a shot at making the NFR. Being a part of the ERA has given me an opportunity to compete at a high level of competition for a big purse without taking away from my family and business. Shafer lives in Yoder, Wyoming with her husband where they both train futurity barrel horses. Her hobbies include being home with family and friends and riding colts. “I believe surrounding yourself with hard working, goal oriented people will only make you a tougher person and competitor”

ASHLEY SCHAEFER Q&A

Q: How did you get your start?
A: I grew up on the back of a horse. My mom trained horses and let me run her great horse Leo, he taught me so much and instilled my love for roping and running barrels.

Q: What excites you most about the sport?
A: I’m very excited about the diversity of rodeos, getting to be around such a variety of people all passionate about their event. I believe surrounding yourself with hard working, goal oriented people will only make you a tougher person and competitor

Q: Who was your mentor or role model at the start of your career?
A: Jolene Montgomery has been a huge mentor in my training career. She took me in and showed me the ropes in the Futurity industry. Her positive attitude and strong work ethic were a great influence in the start of my career! Joy Wargo is also one of my role models. She is a great hand and has helped me improve not only my training but my riding and mental game.

Q: What does practice look like to you?
A: Practice is slow and correct for me. I work on getting correct rate to keep them honest coming into their turns. I also work on strong forward motion around the barrels, getting them to drive off their hind end and reach with their front end.

Q: What does your family mean to your success?
A: My family is the biggest part of my success in many ways. My parents and sisters taught me good work ethic and they are very supportive. My husband is also very positive and supportive. He is a great competitor and trainer. Not only does he help me keep my horses tuned up he has helped me so much with the mental aspect of being a tough competitor.

ERA Questions
Due to my career as a Futurity Trainer I don’t get to go to enough rodeos to have a shot at making the NFR. Being a part of the ERA has given me an opportunity to compete at a high level of competition for a big purse without taking away from my family and business.

Personal Questions
Q: How many years have you competed at the pro level in rodeo?
A: This is my first year to rodeo on a professional level. I have been a professional Futurity Trainer/competitor for about 6 years.

Q: How did you get your start?
A: I grew up on the back of a horse. My mom trained horses and let me run her great horse Leo, he taught me so much and instilled my love for roping and running barrels.
Q: What excites you most about the sport?
A: I’m very excited about the diversity of rodeos, getting to be around such a variety of people all passionate about their event. I believe surrounding yourself with hard working, goal oriented people will only make you a tougher person and competitor.
Q: Who was your mentor or role model at the start of your career?
A: Jolene Montgomery has been a huge mentor in my training career. She took me in and showed me the ropes in the Futurity industry. Her positive attitude and strong work ethic were a great influence in the start of my career! Joy Wargo is also one of my role models. She is a great hand and has helped me improve not only my training but my riding and mental game.

Q: Tell us about your rookie year and any advice you have for those just starting out?
A: I’ll let you know next year!

Q: Do you have a rodeo routine you stick to when preparing to compete? Any silly superstition?
A: I trot and lope until they are loose enough to prevent injury. I also have a few things I do to make sure they are soft in the rib cage, quick on their feet and listening to me.

Q: What does practice look like to you?
A: Practice is slow and correct for me. I work on getting correct rate to keep them honest coming into their turns. I also work on strong forward motion around the barrels, getting them to drive off their hind end and reach with their front end.

Q: What is your favorite part about traveling?
A: Seeing new places and there is no better place to spend quality time with your family than hours in a cab!
Q: What is your least favorite part about traveling?
A: Road construction and blowouts.
Q: Do you bring you family along with you? Any special rodeo road pets?
A: My son Payson comes everywhere with me. My husband Seth comes when he can and my mom Kathy comes when he can’t. Watson the wiener dog also comes along.
Q: Before you back in the box…what is on your mind?
A: I always try to think about riding square and to my spots and hope that the rest will take care of itself!
Q: Tell us your most memorable moment in rodeo.
A: Getting to run at RFDTV’s The American at AT&T Stadium!

Q: Tell us your most challenging moment in rodeo.
A: I would have to say the biggest challenge I had to overcome as a competitor was the mental aspect. Being confident in yourself and your horses is very crucial to being successful.
Q: Tell us your most memorable moment in rodeo that you can remember while growing up and being a fan of rodeo.
A: I grew up in Lenox, Iowa and our hometown rodeo is one of the best! As a fan it has always been one of my favorites!
Q: What does your family mean to your success?
A: My family is the biggest part of my success in many ways. My parents and sisters taught me good work ethic and they are very supportive. My husband is also very positive and supportive. He is a great competitor and trainer. Not only does he help me keep my horses tuned up he has helped me so much with the mental aspect of being a tough competitor.
Q: When you’re not on the road what do you like to do for fun?
A: Spend time with family and friends.